dreamingofrob:

Random close-ups

So. Much. Pretty.

(via rdmickey1989)

verenajj:

THE ADVERTISER - HIT

Ohhh.

(via rdmickey1989)

edit - New Rey image | Courier & Mail via @ RPAustralia

Oh. Wow.

(Source: creationsbyjules, via rdmickey1989)

socalmom2four:

Happy Birthday @overflow_joy!!  Hope you have a beautiful day!! xo

That’s a whole lotta UNF, right there.

verenajj:

THE_ROVER_PREMIERE_CANNES_MAY_18TH_2014

Oh, myeeeee.

verenajj:

THE_ROVER_PREMIERE_CANNES_MAY_18TH_2014

Oh, myeeeee.

Our Prime Minister is just embarrassing. 

(Source: sandandglass, via geekmehard)

sourcedumal:

"Well at least we got POC nobles in the background"

But they stylin tho

I could be wrong, but aren’t those Angie’s kids? Pax and Zahaha?

(Source: lepetitelion, via geekmehard)

s-o-c-i-e-t-y:

starfleetgrad:

petitedino:

supamans-girl:

paging-doctorfaggot:

katiekatiekatiee:

jecoart:

THIS is FUCKING PENCIL!

can never get over these

what the heck man

this deserves all of the recognition in the world

holy

i’ve never seen a picture look more like a photograph in my life

HOW THE FUCK DID HE DO THIS

GTFO! No, seriously.

(Source: blua, via mermaidicecream)

say you’re happy now … once more with feeling

The genius of this episode still astonishes me.

(Source: sulietsexual, via pagetvbrewster)

jeanettebattista:

captcreate:

captcreate:

I’m fucking crying… look at the walls lmfaoooo

Damn it, I had to see this again, I’ll be giggling myself to sleep for an hour.

If Wolverine were a cat. My life is complete.

I want to marry whoever made this. 

jeanettebattista:

captcreate:

captcreate:

I’m fucking crying… look at the walls lmfaoooo

Damn it, I had to see this again, I’ll be giggling myself to sleep for an hour.

If Wolverine were a cat. My life is complete.

I want to marry whoever made this. 

(Source: kittiezandtittiez, via geekmehard)

peace-love-and-sexymen:

pattinson360:

Translation of Rob’s Premiere's interview

April 14, 2014. It’s been forty minutes since Robert Pattinson disappeared for makeup in one of the rooms of this warehouse transformed in a photo studio for the occasion. When he finally emerges, his face covered with black and white paints which fade a few minutes later after gallons of water and Gatorade are thrown at him, it is clear that the Twilight saga teen idol is no longer among us. 
He has been ousted by an increasingly fascinating actor, an artist (he created, with photographer Danielle Levitt, the various sets of the photoshoot), whose films are seriously starting to impress. He has filmed with Werner Herzog (Queen of the Desert) and Anton Corbijn (Life) since the beginning of the year and will soon be adding Harmony Korine and James Gray (The Lost City of Z) to the list. After showing Cosmopolis in 2012, he returns to Cannes this month with two films: Maps to the Stars, for which he reunited with with David Cronenberg, and The Rover, the new feature film from Australian prodigy David Michôd (Animal Kingdom, 2011), a striking futuristic western in which Pattison, more impressive than ever, proves that the future belongs to him.
Première: We left you two years on the back seat of the Cosmopolis limo and we find you behind the wheel of another limo in Maps to the Stars, the new film by David Cronenberg. Did he do it on purpose? 
Robert Pattinson: Maybe we are in the process of making a trilogy about limousines… I don’t know if it is deliberate from him or not.
The common thread is that in each film you bed a great actress…
This scene with Julianne Moore was so funny. Especially since we had just meet when we filmed it!
This was also the case with Juliette Binoche when you filmed the sex scene in Cosmopolis. Is this your new way of welcoming actresses on the sets?
I remember Julianne before we started filming the scene. She was giving me advice: “Carry on choosing classy projects and making smart films.” And then David shouts “Action!” and we start to fuck like animals in the car. So classy, indeed … (laughs) 
And on top of that, it was as hot as hell. I was sweating like crazy and huge drops of sweat were beading on my forehead. I wondered if I was having a stroke. Whenever a drop fell, I was trying to to intercept it so it wouldn’t land on Julianne’s back. It was ridiculous. After while, she turned round to me, looking concerned, asking: “You okay? Are you having a panic attack or what?” I was short of breath, completely soaked; her, not at all.
You’re not the type of actor who does things by halves.
That’s the thing. It is my own sweat you see on the screen. On The Rover, my problem was the flies. I’d never seen anything like it! We were permanently covered in fake blood and as soon as we went outside, there’d be flies all over us. From morning to night, it never stopped.
The glamor of the Australian outback…
We really shot in the middle of nowhere. Most of the people you see in the film were recruited locally, like this little man who sells a gun to Guy Pearce and walks away muttering “Fuck, fuck, fuck!” He really was like that. There is also this bloke with this incredible face you see in the store. They found him during a scouting trip. They’d walked into a house thinking it was abandoned and came face to face with this guy and his wife, who was naked - it turned out later that she is a naturist.
A key strength of the film is its minimalism. Was this already the case with the script?
Yes, this feeling of desolation rises from the script, which had struck me by its very ‘hungry’ tone. The set is extremely bare but it manages to create a world of its own, almost alien. A tone which reminded me of Cosmopolis, in a way.
That film was clearly a watershed in your career. You told us that it had “given you balls" you. Are they still growing?
When you’re filming a big studio movie, you’re contributing to a whole without really knowing how. With the smaller films that I do now - and it is undoubtedly due to their ambition - I feel like I’m creating something. This is much more palpable. David Michôd has let me try loads of stuff on The Rover, like having rotten teeth, or shaving the back of my head because I thought it made the character more vulnerable to have his neck exposed.
The Rover looks like a new phase in your career. Is this also your impression? 
The first time I had the feeling of seeing an adult when watching myself on the screen was when I first saw the Dior advert I shot last year with of Romain Gavras. The Rover has strengthened this feeling, and that continued with Life, the movie I just shot with Corbijn. I think I have more confidence in myself, and being a part of these Cannes selections contribute to this enormously. After being derided for years because of Twilight, my ego had taken a beating.
Do you see this festival as a accolade?
You have no idea… it’s a huge acknowledgement. For a long time, I long to take on roles without really knowing if I would be able to do them justice. Today, I feel ready to take the risks and assume them.
Two years ago, you told us that you were desperate to contact Romain Gavras. You  finally succeeded.
This advert for Dior was the only way I found to reach him. I thought: “He’s bound to reply.” I just had the feeling I was buying this phone call… (laughs)
Where did the concept to make you look like a young Belmondo come from?
Dior, even if their original idea was more sophisticated. It was pared down as we went along. The way in which Roman and his director of photography film gives a feel which is very much alive. 
You should know that we weren’t really given permission to film the part where I drive on the beach. Roman did it at 7am, and he kept shouting: “Hurry up, we’re losing the light!” What light? It’s 7 am! The sand was wet, the car was sinking in it. So I had to drive at 60 miles an hour with two supermodels in the back of the car, and Romain kept screaming: “The light! We’re losing the light!”.
I never thought that I would find myself in this kind of advert one day, but I have to admit that it was a very positive experience. Dior gave us an incredible amount of freedom.
During our last interview, you also told us that you dreamed of working with James Gray, what will soon be the case (Pattinson take a leading role in “The Lost City of Z”, alongside Benedict Cumberbatch.)
Shooting has been pushed back again, to January, I can’t wait. It will be in Colombia; it’s gonna be crazy. In the meantime, maybe I’ll shoot something with Harmony Korine, which I’ve dreamed of doing since I was 17, as I did with James Gray. I keep asking him what the film is about, but he won’t tell me.
You have just added Werner Herzog (Queen of the Desert, starring Nicole Kidman) to your CV… (the interview says Noami Watts)
I did not expect it at all. It’s a small role, but I loved working with him. Whatever the topic, he always has some improbable story or anecdote to tell. We were on the set when Amanda Knox’ trial (an American accused of murdering one of her roommates in Italy) was reopened, and Herzog told us, very seriously: “I have seen some papers that the public does not have access to, and I can assure you that she is guilty.”(laughs)  I did not believe him for a minute, clearly.
Are you still as popular with the paparazzi or has hysteria died down?
I have made ​​progress in the art of not being seen. The last time I went to London, I was not photographed the entire trip. My best friend told me: “Next time they take your picture, remember this time when we left you alone. Do not see it as an extension of the years the paparazzi harassed you, but as an isolated incident.” 
He’s right. Before, I sometimes freaked out when I was papped in the street. It’s different when you’re a guy, because beyond the intrusion into your private life, it feels like your masculinity is being trampled, in a way. There you are, with these people who can harass you with their cameras with impunity and you can’t do anything… There were times when I literally wanted to kill them. 
I’ve calmed down since. I think… but maybe it’s just because it’s not happening as much. What’s twisted in all this is that I do a job where I’m paid to be someone else. How can the audience find any of it credible if they see me every day in the tabloids, doing my grocery shopping?
So, does that mean you get your groceries delivered?
No, I order from Domino’s Pizza every day! (laughs)
We often see actors accepting a blockbuster between two independent movies, saying that’s what they need to do in order to continue filming more “artistic” projects. Yet you seem to have completely dropped studio movies..
Yes, because I do not believe in this idea that we should alternate the two. The audience does not care that you do a “big” or “small” movie; they just wants to see you in a movie. Sometimes, actors take on carry on taking large projects, until the day when everything stops all of a sudden. 
And here they are clueless: “I don’t understand, I’ve followed the rules…” Except there are no rules. Everything can collapse overnight. The advantage, if it happens to me, is that I can always make myself a few hundred dollars signing autographs in the Twilight conventions! (laughs)
How long do you think it will it be before Hollywood reboots the series?
I don’t know. I think the fashion for vampires is over, isn’t it? It’s funny, a few days ago, I was with someone, remembering shooting a scene. I think it’s the first of the last one, when Bella wakes up and sees Edward, a bit like an apparition. We’d been shooting in Canada for a month; it was freezing; I was on the edge of depression, and the only thing that I had found to cheer me up was going to McDonald’s for breakfast every morning. 
After four weeks of this, it’s time to shoot the scene in question, in which I’m wearing a white shirt and backlit. Viewing the rushes later, I realized that I could see the outline of my newly-acquired love handles against the backlight. I stumbled across the film on TV recently, and they’re still there.
After all these years, I’m amazed there are still stories to tell about Twilight…
When I think that the first one was released six years ago and so I landed this role in 2007, it seems surreal to me. Most of my twenties will have been devoted to this saga. At the première of the second one, I knew then it was going to take me ten years to be myself again and move on.
The two films are you presenting at Cannes show that it has taken you less than ten years to do so…
I’m really excited to return to the Festival. I want all my films to be selected there. So far, all three feature films I have shot since the last Twilight have been and I plan to do everything I can to maintain this objective.


Fantastic interview :)

peace-love-and-sexymen:

pattinson360:

Translation of Rob’s Premiere's interview

April 14, 2014. It’s been forty minutes since Robert Pattinson disappeared for makeup in one of the rooms of this warehouse transformed in a photo studio for the occasion. When he finally emerges, his face covered with black and white paints which fade a few minutes later after gallons of water and Gatorade are thrown at him, it is clear that the Twilight saga teen idol is no longer among us.

He has been ousted by an increasingly fascinating actor, an artist (he created, with photographer Danielle Levitt, the various sets of the photoshoot), whose films are seriously starting to impress. He has filmed with Werner Herzog (Queen of the Desert) and Anton Corbijn (Life) since the beginning of the year and will soon be adding Harmony Korine and James Gray (The Lost City of Z) to the list. After showing Cosmopolis in 2012, he returns to Cannes this month with two films: Maps to the Stars, for which he reunited with with David Cronenberg, and The Rover, the new feature film from Australian prodigy David Michôd (Animal Kingdom, 2011), a striking futuristic western in which Pattison, more impressive than ever, proves that the future belongs to him.

Première: We left you two years on the back seat of the Cosmopolis limo and we find you behind the wheel of another limo in Maps to the Stars, the new film by David Cronenberg. Did he do it on purpose?

Robert Pattinson: Maybe we are in the process of making a trilogy about limousines… I don’t know if it is deliberate from him or not.

The common thread is that in each film you bed a great actress…

This scene with Julianne Moore was so funny. Especially since we had just meet when we filmed it!

This was also the case with Juliette Binoche when you filmed the sex scene in Cosmopolis. Is this your new way of welcoming actresses on the sets?

I remember Julianne before we started filming the scene. She was giving me advice: “Carry on choosing classy projects and making smart films.” And then David shouts “Action!” and we start to fuck like animals in the car. So classy, indeed … (laughs)

And on top of that, it was as hot as hell. I was sweating like crazy and huge drops of sweat were beading on my forehead. I wondered if I was having a stroke. Whenever a drop fell, I was trying to to intercept it so it wouldn’t land on Julianne’s back. It was ridiculous. After while, she turned round to me, looking concerned, asking: “You okay? Are you having a panic attack or what?” I was short of breath, completely soaked; her, not at all.

You’re not the type of actor who does things by halves.

That’s the thing. It is my own sweat you see on the screen. On The Rover, my problem was the flies. I’d never seen anything like it! We were permanently covered in fake blood and as soon as we went outside, there’d be flies all over us. From morning to night, it never stopped.

The glamor of the Australian outback…

We really shot in the middle of nowhere. Most of the people you see in the film were recruited locally, like this little man who sells a gun to Guy Pearce and walks away muttering “Fuck, fuck, fuck!” He really was like that. There is also this bloke with this incredible face you see in the store. They found him during a scouting trip. They’d walked into a house thinking it was abandoned and came face to face with this guy and his wife, who was naked - it turned out later that she is a naturist.

A key strength of the film is its minimalism. Was this already the case with the script?

Yes, this feeling of desolation rises from the script, which had struck me by its very ‘hungry’ tone. The set is extremely bare but it manages to create a world of its own, almost alien. A tone which reminded me of Cosmopolis, in a way.

That film was clearly a watershed in your career. You told us that it had “given you balls" you. Are they still growing?

When you’re filming a big studio movie, you’re contributing to a whole without really knowing how. With the smaller films that I do now - and it is undoubtedly due to their ambition - I feel like I’m creating something. This is much more palpable. David Michôd has let me try loads of stuff on The Rover, like having rotten teeth, or shaving the back of my head because I thought it made the character more vulnerable to have his neck exposed.

The Rover looks like a new phase in your career. Is this also your impression?

The first time I had the feeling of seeing an adult when watching myself on the screen was when I first saw the Dior advert I shot last year with of Romain Gavras. The Rover has strengthened this feeling, and that continued with Life, the movie I just shot with Corbijn. I think I have more confidence in myself, and being a part of these Cannes selections contribute to this enormously. After being derided for years because of Twilight, my ego had taken a beating.

Do you see this festival as a accolade?

You have no idea… it’s a huge acknowledgement. For a long time, I long to take on roles without really knowing if I would be able to do them justice. Today, I feel ready to take the risks and assume them.

Two years ago, you told us that you were desperate to contact Romain Gavras. You  finally succeeded.

This advert for Dior was the only way I found to reach him. I thought: “He’s bound to reply.” I just had the feeling I was buying this phone call… (laughs)

Where did the concept to make you look like a young Belmondo come from?

Dior, even if their original idea was more sophisticated. It was pared down as we went along. The way in which Roman and his director of photography film gives a feel which is very much alive.

You should know that we weren’t really given permission to film the part where I drive on the beach. Roman did it at 7am, and he kept shouting: “Hurry up, we’re losing the light!” What light? It’s 7 am! The sand was wet, the car was sinking in it. So I had to drive at 60 miles an hour with two supermodels in the back of the car, and Romain kept screaming: “The light! We’re losing the light!”.

I never thought that I would find myself in this kind of advert one day, but I have to admit that it was a very positive experience. Dior gave us an incredible amount of freedom.

During our last interview, you also told us that you dreamed of working with James Gray, what will soon be the case (Pattinson take a leading role in “The Lost City of Z”, alongside Benedict Cumberbatch.)

Shooting has been pushed back again, to January, I can’t wait. It will be in Colombia; it’s gonna be crazy. In the meantime, maybe I’ll shoot something with Harmony Korine, which I’ve dreamed of doing since I was 17, as I did with James Gray. I keep asking him what the film is about, but he won’t tell me.

You have just added Werner Herzog (Queen of the Desert, starring Nicole Kidman) to your CV… (the interview says Noami Watts)

I did not expect it at all. It’s a small role, but I loved working with him. Whatever the topic, he always has some improbable story or anecdote to tell. We were on the set when Amanda Knox’ trial (an American accused of murdering one of her roommates in Italy) was reopened, and Herzog told us, very seriously: “I have seen some papers that the public does not have access to, and I can assure you that she is guilty.”(laughs)  I did not believe him for a minute, clearly.

Are you still as popular with the paparazzi or has hysteria died down?

I have made ​​progress in the art of not being seen. The last time I went to London, I was not photographed the entire trip. My best friend told me: “Next time they take your picture, remember this time when we left you alone. Do not see it as an extension of the years the paparazzi harassed you, but as an isolated incident.”

He’s right. Before, I sometimes freaked out when I was papped in the street. It’s different when you’re a guy, because beyond the intrusion into your private life, it feels like your masculinity is being trampled, in a way. There you are, with these people who can harass you with their cameras with impunity and you can’t do anything… There were times when I literally wanted to kill them.

I’ve calmed down since. I think… but maybe it’s just because it’s not happening as much. What’s twisted in all this is that I do a job where I’m paid to be someone else. How can the audience find any of it credible if they see me every day in the tabloids, doing my grocery shopping?


So, does that mean you get your groceries delivered?

No, I order from Domino’s Pizza every day! (laughs)

We often see actors accepting a blockbuster between two independent movies, saying that’s what they need to do in order to continue filming more “artistic” projects. Yet you seem to have completely dropped studio movies..

Yes, because I do not believe in this idea that we should alternate the two. The audience does not care that you do a “big” or “small” movie; they just wants to see you in a movie. Sometimes, actors take on carry on taking large projects, until the day when everything stops all of a sudden.

And here they are clueless: “I don’t understand, I’ve followed the rules…” Except there are no rules. Everything can collapse overnight. The advantage, if it happens to me, is that I can always make myself a few hundred dollars signing autographs in the Twilight conventions! (laughs)

How long do you think it will it be before Hollywood reboots the series?

I don’t know. I think the fashion for vampires is over, isn’t it? It’s funny, a few days ago, I was with someone, remembering shooting a scene. I think it’s the first of the last one, when Bella wakes up and sees Edward, a bit like an apparition. We’d been shooting in Canada for a month; it was freezing; I was on the edge of depression, and the only thing that I had found to cheer me up was going to McDonald’s for breakfast every morning.

After four weeks of this, it’s time to shoot the scene in question, in which I’m wearing a white shirt and backlit. Viewing the rushes later, I realized that I could see the outline of my newly-acquired love handles against the backlight. I stumbled across the film on TV recently, and they’re still there.

After all these years, I’m amazed there are still stories to tell about Twilight…

When I think that the first one was released six years ago and so I landed this role in 2007, it seems surreal to me. Most of my twenties will have been devoted to this saga. At the première of the second one, I knew then it was going to take me ten years to be myself again and move on.

The two films are you presenting at Cannes show that it has taken you less than ten years to do so…

I’m really excited to return to the Festival. I want all my films to be selected there. So far, all three feature films I have shot since the last Twilight have been and I plan to do everything I can to maintain this objective.

Fantastic interview :)

(via rdmickey1989)

anunchainedmelody:

unamusedsloth:

Some of them look majestic in the sun.

All brilliant, but the final GIF wins.

(via hearthfires-holocausts)

NIGHTNIGHT by DEDDY